Neem extract in the form of oil comes from the neem evergreen tree native to India.

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Why would anyone want to purchase health and beauty products made with an ingredient that has its own fact sheet on the National Pesticide Information Center website?

Neem extract in the form of oil comes from the neem evergreen tree native to India. While it has been used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine practices for various health purposes, it is also a naturally occurring pesticide.

Npic.orst.edu lists neem oil warnings: Skin and stomach irritations are potential symptoms of exposure.

As an insecticide, gardeningknowhow.com lauds neem oil extract as “everything a gardener could want.” A neem oil spray is especially effective at repelling mites, but also 200 other species of chewing and sucking insects.

The site shares how neem oil works to repel pests: It is “absorbed by the plant and distributed through the tissue. Once the product is in the plant’s vascular system, insects intake it during feeding. The compound causes insects to reduce or cease feeding, can prevent larvae from maturing, reduces or interrupts mating behavior and, in some cases, the oil coats the breathing holes of insects and kills them.”

Yet, verywellhealth.com also shared in May health problems in humans that neem oil may alleviate, including:  
- Asthma
- Constipation
- Cough
- Diabetes
- Gastric ulcers
- Indigestion
- Periodontal disease
- Urinary tract infection

It also reportedly stimulates the immune system.

Beauty-wise, because neem oil contains vitamin E, antioxidants and more, it is added to skin care products to lessen dry skin and wrinkles, stimulate collagen production, reduce scars and treat symptoms relating to acne, psoriasis and eczema.  

However, caution should be taken before administering neem for health and beauty-related reasons since there is limited modern research regarding dangers.

Healthline.com proposed in February that it is “extremely potent” and “not suitable for use by children.”