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Milford Beacon
  • HEALTHCARE Q&A: Meet Toni Bergfelder, President of Bayhealth-Milford Memorial Hospital Auxiliary

  • Toni Bergfelder started volunteering with the Auxiliary of Bayhealth-Milford Memorial Hospital only a year after moving to Delaware, and as the organization's newest president, she said continues to enjoy both the learning experience and social aspect of her volunteer work.
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    • MORE ABOUT BERGFELDER
      HOMETOWN Washington, D.C. and Long Island, N.Y.

      CURRENT TOWN Harrington

      FAMILY Husband, Henry; children Robert Thomas, Jr., 45 and Craig Thomas, 40

      EXPE...
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      MORE ABOUT BERGFELDER
      HOMETOWN Washington, D.C. and Long Island, N.Y.
      CURRENT TOWN Harrington
      FAMILY Husband, Henry; children Robert Thomas, Jr., 45 and Craig Thomas, 40
      EXPERIENCE Air Force for 4.5 years; domestic travel manager for AAA in Arizona for 19.5 years; retired and moved to Delaware in 2006
       
      FAVORITES
      FOOD Lobster
      MOVIE “South Pacific”
      BOOK “Give or Take a Shilling” by Thom Thomas
  • Toni Bergfelder started volunteering with the Auxiliary of Bayhealth-Milford Memorial Hospital only a year after moving to Delaware, and said she enjoyed both the learning experience and social aspect of her volunteer work. Bergfelder was appointed president of the Auxiliary in September, she said, and hopes to keep the organization growing by attracting new members to continue the group’s fundraising efforts for the hospital.
     
    Q: What do you hope to accomplish as the president of the auxiliary? 
    A: We’re always looking for more volunteers to work in our gift shop here in the hospital. Our final goal is to raise money to build the new hospital. The main thing is that we’re raising money and we’re having a good time doing it.
     
    Q: What do you enjoy most about your work with the auxiliary?
    A: Just meeting everyone in Milford, since I was so new, and learning many, many new things. I’m learning who people are within the Bayhealth hospital system. Because I was new and I met so many people that are local − and of course everyone knows everyone or is related in some way − it’s quite a history lesson. The city itself is quite unique.
     
    Q: What are some of the biggest challenges? 
    A: Even though we have over 200 people that belong to the auxiliary, it’s pretty much the same people all the time that are doing work and we need new ideas and other people to step up. Because one of these days, most of us won’t be able to do this and we don’t want to lose the auxiliary.
     
    Q: What are your hopes for Milford’s new hospital and why do you think it’s needed?
    A: It’s necessary because there’s no more room in these buildings for us to do anything. It was built on for many years, just adding on and adding on. And we’re certainly going to be thrilled to get rid of the ramp. We need to make better accommodations for the staff to work. We’re looking forward to providing the best service.
     
    Q: Why do you think people should get involved with the auxiliary?
    A: If they have an interest in their community and what’s going on, they’ll see the need for us to help. The staff here is wonderful, but they need our help. It makes you feel good inside. And all they really need to do is smile because people are not happy generally when they come to the hospital. We provide the smiles.
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