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Milford Beacon
  • City council approves budget, considers referendum, reduces workforce commission

  • Milford City Council approved a balanced Fiscal Year 2014 budget at its June 24 regular council meeting. The $41.4 million budget does not come with any increases in water, electric, sewer or trash rate, but does include a 3 percent raise for all city employees.
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  • Milford City Council approved a balanced Fiscal Year 2014 budget at its June 24 regular council meeting. The $41.4 million budget does not come with any increases in water, electric, sewer or trash rate, but does include a 3 percent raise for all city employees.
    Property owners will not see an increase in the tax rate, as the property tax rate will remain at 46 cents per $100 of assessed value. The budget goes into effect on July 1.
    In other fiscal matters, city officials have begun the process of seeking funding for construction of a new police station. The city council’s finance committee chairman Allen “Skip” Pikus requested that City Finance Director Jeff Portmann, City Manager Richard Carmean and Chief of Police Keith Hudson begin working together on a cost analysis of a new police station. The findings of the cost analysis are to be brought back to council at a later date.
    “Once these costs are collected, the council will have to decide on the funding of this project, with the possibility of a referendum placed before the citizens of Milford,” Pikus said.
    Milford City Council voted in May to finalize a purchase agreement for a 15.6-acre property, owned by Growmark FS at the corner of Northeast Front and Fourth streets for the eventual construction of a new police station.
    The contract required Milford to put down a $50,000 deposit in exchange for a three-year hold on the property, during which the city would have the option to buy the land at a fixed cost of about $875,000.
    The analysis will include the anticipated cost of purchasing the Growmark property, the cost of constructing the building, the cost of installing entrances, parking, fences and lighting and the cost of operating the building on a yearly basis.
    Workforce development commission downsized
    Milford City Council also approved an ordinance to reduce the number of Workforce Development Commission members from 11 to five.
     Several weeks ago, Milford City Councilman Garrett Grier III proposed the reduction because the commission was having difficulty getting a quorum, the minimum number of votes needed to pass a motion.
    As has been city policy previously, two of the five members of the commission will be Mayor Joseph “Ronnie” Rogers or his appointee and Milford School District Superintendent Phyllis Kohel or her appointee.
    City Councilwoman Katrina Wilson, who was appointed to the commission by the council, commented on her lack of attendance at commission meetings.
    “I was a member of this committee based an appointment by council,” Wilson said. “I attended a couple of meetings and then the reason I didn’t attend any more of the meetings is because I felt as though I was being used in a way that I thought I shouldn’t be used. There are so many other meetings that we attend to, at my stage in the game I have to pick what meetings are most important. If I’m not used at the meetings there’s no point in me being there.”
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