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Milford Beacon
  • Mz Pretty aims to 'beat' the odds

  • The average person may have trouble naming even one female hip-hop music producer, which sadly says something about the lack of successful ladies behind beats in this industry.
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  • The average person may have trouble naming even one female hip-hop music producer, which sadly says something about the lack of successful ladies behind beats in this industry.
    So producer/singer-songwriter and pianist Emmery "Mz Pretty" Williams-Wideman, 23 of Milford, is looking to change this with her new mixtape. The project, slated for August, is a collaboration with her big brother, emcee/producer and drummer Robbie "R-Dub" Williams, 25 of Milford. What's more, the mixtape will feature beats from both producers as well as rhymes from the wordsmith R-Dub and soulful vocals from Mz Pretty.
    You can get a taste of this new project by checking out their new song, "All In The Mind," a smooth, soul-sampled tune meshed with a tinge of spacy synth, produced by Pretty with rhymes from R-Dub as he shares honest introspective on how the world isn't completely against him.
    The Milford Beacon spoke with Mz Pretty about the new project, being a female hip-hop producer and more.
    Q What's it like making music with your brother?
    A We usually get things done pretty quickly, if we're in the mood.
    Q How's his production style differ from yours?
    A I'll have a lot more mainstream-sounding [beats]. He doesn't use synths, fake drums and claps. His style is different and it's more underground.
    Q How'd you get into producing?
    A My whole family plays music, actually. My mother sings, and I think she got her BA in singing at Wesley College. And my father used to play in the Air Force. He played bass and he used to travel all over the world in the Air Force band. And Robbie is a drummer, so we all play. He actually went to Peabody Institute.
    Q Are you familiar with any female producers in hip-hop?
    A Most women write songs. As far as them actually producing tracks, I just don't know their names if there are any who do it. There are [probably] very, very few.
    Q Do men respect you as a female producer?
    A It's difficult sometimes. If you're decent at it you'll get some pretty headstrong men that are a little disrespectful and they won't think you made the track. They'll say "this beat is by a man." But I don't know what a man's beat sounds like.
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