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Milford Beacon
  • Milford City Council awards bids for water treatment plant replacement

  • The replacement of the Washington Street Water Treatment Facility officially got underway when Milford City Council approved the digging of a new well earlier this spring, but the project to replace the 60-year-old facility took another step forward at the May 13 City Council meeting.
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  • The replacement of the Washington Street Water Treatment Facility officially got underway when Milford City Council approved the digging of a new well earlier this spring, but the project to replace the 60-year-old facility took another step forward at the May 13 City Council meeting.
    Milford City Council moved to award the contract to demolish the Washington Street Water Treatment Facility, located at 5 S. Washington St., to Richard E. Pierson Construction Company, of Pilesgrove, N.J.
    The lowest of two bidders, the company agreed to complete the demolition of the facility for $177,480. That cost includes the demolition of storage buildings, office space, the plant itself, disconnecting and disposing of site utilities and materials and demolition of the water treatment plant’s tower.
    The facility will be demolished in mid-June, said Milford City Manager Richard Carmean.
    “They may very well be able to get it done sooner,” Carmen said. “The problem is when you are uncovering things you don’t know was there. It may take longer because of something that they uncover.”
    After the old facility has been demolished, the next step will be to seek bids for the building of the new reservoir and water treatment facility. The new facility will be located on the same piece of land. The entire project is slated to be complete by late 2014.
    The $4 million project is being funded through a low-interest loan through the Delaware Revolving Water Fund. It was approved by Milford residents in a 2011 referendum.
    The City Council also made a budget adjustment for the rehabilitation of the Washington Street Sewage Pump Station. That project was approved by referendum in 2008. The contract to repair the 35-year-old facility was awarded to Bearing Construction Inc. of Sudlersville, Md. back in February. The company was the lowest bidder with a total cost of $762,400. The bulk of the project was be paid for with $600,000 in bond issuance funds, which were left over after a $3.5 million project to repair the sewer infrastructure, which was completed earlier this spring.
    “My finance director needed to transfer money into project,” Carmen said. “The project needed additional funds to meet cost.”
    City Council voted to pay for the outstanding $162,400 with money from the sewer reserve funds at last Tuesday’s meeting.

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